Friday the 13th Came & Went – But the Marketing Effect Stays


Where Did This Superstition Come From?

A suggested origin of the superstition is that  the date Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar on —Friday, 13 October 1307. But hear this out – this may not have been formulated until the 20th century! Why? Because any reference to this event is only mentioned in the 1955 Maurice Druon historical novel The Iron King (Le Roi de fer), John J. Robinson’s 1989 work Born in Blood: The Lost Secrets of Freemasonry, Dan Brown’s 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and Steve Berry’s The Templar Legacy (2006). Sure, in Biblical history, Jesus Christ had his last Supper on the 13th, and was crucified on the Friday, but these two were never mentioned together simultaneously thereafter.

So Friday 13th is Just A Marketing Ploy?

There’s a very high chance that it just is! And look at it’s effectiveness. According to the Stress Management Center and Phobia Institute in Asheville, North Carolina, an estimated 17 to 21 million people in the United States are affected by a fear of this day, making it the most feared day and date in history. Some people are so paralyzed by fear that they avoid their normal routines in doing business, taking flights or even getting out of bed.

Well, it’s ok if it’s harmless, right? Just being cautious, one might say. But get this. It’s been estimated that USD 800-900 million is lost in business on this day alone. In fact, in Finland, a consortium of governmental and nongovernmental organizations led by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health promotes the National Accident Day, which always falls on a Friday the 13th. Also, a study in the British Medical Journal, published in 1993, concluded that there “is a significant level of traffic-related incidences on Friday the 13th as opposed to a random day, such as Friday the 6th, in the UK.”

How You Can Get Such an Impact in Your Business

When you first launch your website, the quickest way to gain traction and expand your brand is to focus on a niche market. This means zeroing in on a smaller market with less competition. But to get to near-cult status at some point, you need to expand beyond that. Before you try to reach the global marketplace, you should take the time to carefully plan your new marketing strategy.

Don’t Forget Your Roots

Targeting the global market is a lot different that targeting a niche market. You have a larger audience, but you also have more competition. Despite that, you shouldn’t ignore your niche market and forget where you came from. You can continue to hold onto your hold of your niche market while targeting a larger audience. Continue what you’ve been doing that works to keep your existing sales through your niche market. You’ll simply develop new strategies to reach a larger market.

Localize Your Content to Each Region

When you are targeting multiple cities, you’ll need to create an individual landing page for each city. By using content to refer to places, people, and things that people in that city will recognize, it will bring about familiarity. This is localization and you’ll use it in your global marketing campaigns.

The easiest method of localization, however, would be through language and slang. About two-thirds of the world’s population are non-native English speakers. Most of these people, even if they can speak English, prefer to browse the web and shop online in their native language. It’s easy to add the option to translate your web pages into a different language (example, the Google Translate plugin).

You’re Ready for the Big Time

If you’d like to have access to even more powerful marketing tips, as well as a way to generate conversion-ready Internet marketing prospects each month, click here to learn about my done-for-you system.

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *